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According to the International Energy Agency (IEA), that’s how many EVs will be on the road, up from 3 million in 2017.

Batteries now cost less, weigh less and last longer*

Battery cost is declining as energy density increases; the need for reliable thermal control is greater than ever before.

Expanding the number of electric vehicles on the road requires development of new types of battery systems to meet the demands of the modern driver.  According to Riem, “True EVs that rely only on electric power must compete with the expectations set by hybrid technology and traditional fuel-powered vehicles. Next-generation EVs have to be competitive when it comes to driving range, acceleration, charge time, convenience and cost.

Battery designs that deliver these capabilities will no doubt have exponentially greater power densities and thermal loads.
 

Cool xEVs take Many Forms

Efficiently managing the heat generated during all phases of battery function drives performance for the long haul.  “Cooling the battery system effectively extends its lifetime, enables more reliable operation and a better overall experience. And there are numerous considerations for the best thermal control approach.” 

Riem explains that thermal management materials are integrated throughout the battery structure and take many forms – from pads to adhesives to liquids. For Henkel, it’s not just about innovating and expanding the power storage thermal materials portfolio; it’s about understanding the system requirements and process parameters holistically. “We’ve gone from developing liquid gap fillers for small, millimeter-sized deposits to innovating materials that can be automatically dispensed in liters to accommodate battery thermal control needs while facilitating high-volume manufacturing.

Riem sees well beyond today’s disparate EV battery systems to a more standardized approach in the near future, with thermal transfer capability being a significant enabler of next-generation designs.


*MIT Technology Review, December 17, 2018   

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